History Camp is an initiative of The Pursuit of History

History Camp®

History Camp welcomes people of all ages and from all walks of life—students, teachers and professors, authors, bloggers, reenactors, interpreters, museum and historical society directors and board members, genealogists, and, anyone else, regardless of profession or degree, who is interested in history and wants to learn more.

How did History Camp start?

In late 2013, Lee Wright approached three authors and bloggers in the Boston area and proposed that they adapt the format that he’d seen work at Boston BarCamp to the topic of history. John Bell, Sam Forman, and Liz Covart got things started by posting sessions they would present to a wiki so that others could get an idea of what to expect. Things came together fairly quickly, and on March 8, 2014 they held the first History Camp. It took place in Cambridge at a facility that IBM donated for the day. One hundred twenty-nine people attended 23 sessions and two panels.

Who is behind History Camp today?

The Pursuit of History manages History Camp Boston, History Camp Colorado, History Camp Virginia, History Camp Philadelphia and future History Camps across the country. (History Camp Pioneer Valley and History Camp Iowa are managed by local volunteer committees.)

Where can I learn more?

For the latest on History Camp, visit our official website at historycamp.org.


Boston, MA 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 (P)
Littleton, CO 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 (P)
Fairfax, VA 2019 2020 (P)
Philadelphia, PA 2020 (P)
History Camp Online 2020

(P) = Postponed due to COVID-19.

America’s Summer Roadtrip

On August 1, 2020, America’s Summer Roadtrip took viewers across the country and through our nation’s history for 12, hour-long livestreams from 12 leading historic sites. Conducted by leading expert guides, each tour included a special behind-the-scenes look at something that visitors would not get to see if they went in person.

In addition the livestream on the site, americassummerroadtrip.org, the project also live-streamed through Facebook and posted all the presentations to its website for later viewing.

  • Historic New Bridge Landing (River Edge, NJ) – Revolutionary War battle site & Washington headquarters
  • The Rebecca Nurse Homestead (Salem, MA) – Home of woman convicted and executed in Salem Witch Trials
  • Faneuil Hall (Boston) – Cradle of Liberty. The site of historic meetings, speeches, and debates for 275 years
  • Minute Man National Park (Lexington and Concord) – Site of the first battle in the Revolutionary War
  • National Underground Railroad Freedom Center (Cincinnati) – Abolitionist-era museum and education center dedicated to ongoing struggle for freedom and equality
  • The Molly Brown House (Denver) – Famed Titanic survivor’s ornate Victorian-era mansion
  • Thomas Edison National Historical Park (West Orange, NJ) – Industrial facility built by Edison in 1887 to research and develop his inventions
  • Wright Brothers National Memorial (Kill Devil Hills, NC) – Site of the first successful, sustained, powered flights in a heavier-than-air machine
  • American Heritage Museum (Hudson, MA) – Military history museum with extensive collection of vehicles from World War II, as well as World War I and other wars
  • Heart Mountain Interpretive Center (Powell, WY) – WW II Japanese American confinement camp
  • Chaco Culture National Historical Park (New Mexico) – Ruins of the largest and most advanced ancient Pueblo villages in the Southwest
  • Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park (Near Sacramento) – Site of discovery that sparked California’s 1849 “Gold Rush”

Conducted by leading expert guides, each tour included a special behind-the-scenes look at something that visitors would not get to see if they went in person.

In addition to the livestream on the site, AmericasSummerRoadtrip.org, the project also live-streamed through Facebook and posted all the tours so that anyone could view them later viewing.

The sites appreciated the opportunity to connect with a broader audience and folks who watched loved it.

Thanks for the best day since my travel wings have been clipped. Keep up the great work!

— Pat S.

It was amazing, overflowing with fascinating content and well-organized beyond my expectations!
You guys did an amazing job! Great work!

— Joan S.

Thanks for a great day. I watched all of the stops.  I really enjoyed the Fanueil Hall stop—the speaker was especially enthusiastic about the topic. Also loved the Edison stop and the Wright Brothers stop, being an engineer myself!
Bought all the books and a shirt for myself to commemorate the day! Thanks so much!

— Jen

It was an amazing day. I had to miss the 4:00 pm segment but can view it later; saw the rest live. You must be exhausted but we are so grateful.

— Ellen

I have watched all of the programs today and have enjoyed the experience very much! I hope you will do this again.
As a senior who has been quarantined alone since March, this was a fun and informative day.
I don’t think I have been to any of these places and learned a tremendous amount. Thank you so much!

— Brenda L.

Another great event!  We greatly appreciate everyone’s work.  Can’t wait to visit the New Mexico sites, perhaps in 2021. Thanks all!

— Christine W.

As someone who is pretty strict on staying in as much as possible during the time, I am on the constant search for virtual programming beyond binge-watching TV. Today was an excellent and safe way for me to “travel” around the country and see sites that I have never been or even knew about. I watched for most of the day and plan to go back and catch the handful of sites (Molly Brown House/Minute Man) that I missed out on.

— Diana T.

Amazing!  Counting the last episode, which is about to start, we’ve watched six of today’s programs.
Really tremendous, especially those lesser-known (but very important) sites. It was great to cross the country on this journey.

I ❤️ History! This was sensational.

— Terri E.

America’s Summer Roadtrip is made possible by donations to The Pursuit of History, including from Lorna Hainesworth,whose donation helped ensure a great video experience.